danagryphon: (Guard)
So I'm not competing in K&Q Rapier Champs. The little bit of fencing I did at Duello and the exertions of the weekend after that proved to me that the arthritis in my hip just really isn't going to tolerate it. And when the boys' troop camping trip got scheduled for the same weekend, for a while it looked like I wasn't even going to be able to go.

But, hubby has stepped up to take the boys on the camping trip (at least for Saturday, and I will take over for Sunday), and a new incentive has tickled my fancy for going to the event.

I'm teaching a class. It's going to be "Making a Leather Fencing Gorget", since it has been suggested to [livejournal.com profile] chrystie69  to put a bug in my ear that gorgets are usually the most commonly needed piece of fencing protective gear that most people don't feel they can make on their own. But they can. So I'm going to have a workshop, and even let a limited number of participants be able to make one for themselves. I'm not sure how much call there will be for that, since one presumes that most of the people coming to fence in a kingdom championship level tourney actually HAVE gorgets. But I suppose there could always be the relative newbie, or maybe someone who wants to get into fencing but is daunted by the idea of coming up with protective gear. So we shall see. Worse case, I'll make one or two spares that I can donate to the Shire for their loaner gear.

I might also consider talking to M about putting up our fencing gear for sale, since it looks like neither one of us is going to be doing it anymore. Although E has expressed a desire to learn to fence when he is old enough. So maybe I'll keep it after all.
danagryphon: (Guard)
So I'm not competing in K&Q Rapier Champs. The little bit of fencing I did at Duello and the exertions of the weekend after that proved to me that the arthritis in my hip just really isn't going to tolerate it. And when the boys' troop camping trip got scheduled for the same weekend, for a while it looked like I wasn't even going to be able to go.

But, hubby has stepped up to take the boys on the camping trip (at least for Saturday, and I will take over for Sunday), and a new incentive has tickled my fancy for going to the event.

I'm teaching a class. It's going to be "Making a Leather Fencing Gorget", since it has been suggested to [livejournal.com profile] chrystie69  to put a bug in my ear that gorgets are usually the most commonly needed piece of fencing protective gear that most people don't feel they can make on their own. But they can. So I'm going to have a workshop, and even let a limited number of participants be able to make one for themselves. I'm not sure how much call there will be for that, since one presumes that most of the people coming to fence in a kingdom championship level tourney actually HAVE gorgets. But I suppose there could always be the relative newbie, or maybe someone who wants to get into fencing but is daunted by the idea of coming up with protective gear. So we shall see. Worse case, I'll make one or two spares that I can donate to the Shire for their loaner gear.

I might also consider talking to M about putting up our fencing gear for sale, since it looks like neither one of us is going to be doing it anymore. Although E has expressed a desire to learn to fence when he is old enough. So maybe I'll keep it after all.
danagryphon: (Aleksei)
So I just sent in a blurb to the autocrat for the Carolingia cooking schola on October 30. I'm going to be teaching a class on middle eastern spices, specifically the history and mixing of spices to make a proper curry. I'll also touch on the differences in spice mixtures for different regions of the middle east and India.

Here's the blurb so far:

Middle Eastern Spices

Intimidated by the wide variety of spices used in middle eastern cooking? Not sure what goes into a proper curry? Come learn about the different spices, how to obtain them, and how to mix them to get authentic flavors from India, Persia, and Northern Africa.

This will be my first time teaching a cooking class, but so far, middle eastern is what I am most comfortable with.

Although I'm looking forward to doing a Spanish dayboard for the Duello event in November, and have procured an online translation of a 15th c. Spanish cookbook!
danagryphon: (Aleksei)
So I just sent in a blurb to the autocrat for the Carolingia cooking schola on October 30. I'm going to be teaching a class on middle eastern spices, specifically the history and mixing of spices to make a proper curry. I'll also touch on the differences in spice mixtures for different regions of the middle east and India.

Here's the blurb so far:

Middle Eastern Spices

Intimidated by the wide variety of spices used in middle eastern cooking? Not sure what goes into a proper curry? Come learn about the different spices, how to obtain them, and how to mix them to get authentic flavors from India, Persia, and Northern Africa.

This will be my first time teaching a cooking class, but so far, middle eastern is what I am most comfortable with.

Although I'm looking forward to doing a Spanish dayboard for the Duello event in November, and have procured an online translation of a 15th c. Spanish cookbook!
danagryphon: (Celtic Gryphon)
Another full and busy weekend down (and another trip around the Sun).

Cut for length )
danagryphon: (Celtic Gryphon)
Another full and busy weekend down (and another trip around the Sun).

Cut for length )
danagryphon: (Aleksei)
I still have 13 of the foam pieces for making marudi for my kumihimo class, so I should be all set there. Just need to grab my big bag o' extra embroidery floss, samples of finished work, as many pairs of scissors as I can find, and print out a bunch of copies of the handout.

Made 16 oak draw boards for the wire weaving class, dug out a bunch of left over cedar shaft pieces to use as mandrels, now just have to figure out how much wire I need to put in each kit, and go get a big assed roll of it. And dig out as many pairs of pliers as I can put my hands on for loaners. Oh, and make a handout. And get together my samples of completed pieces I've done.

But it's only Monday, so I'm actually in pretty good shape.
danagryphon: (Aleksei)
I still have 13 of the foam pieces for making marudi for my kumihimo class, so I should be all set there. Just need to grab my big bag o' extra embroidery floss, samples of finished work, as many pairs of scissors as I can find, and print out a bunch of copies of the handout.

Made 16 oak draw boards for the wire weaving class, dug out a bunch of left over cedar shaft pieces to use as mandrels, now just have to figure out how much wire I need to put in each kit, and go get a big assed roll of it. And dig out as many pairs of pliers as I can put my hands on for loaners. Oh, and make a handout. And get together my samples of completed pieces I've done.

But it's only Monday, so I'm actually in pretty good shape.
danagryphon: (Default)
I got my yearly email from the Bergental Novice Schola class wrangler, asking if I wanted to teach this year. Last year, I had a conflict with something, I think it was scouts, or maybe another event. This year, despite being on my birthday, I think I'm going to go and teach a couple of classes. Now to figure out what to teach.

I think I definitely want to do Beginning Kumihimo again, it went well last time and was a very satisfying class to teach, since the student got to take something tangible home, and one of them even finished the bracelet she'd started in the class before the event was over.

However, I don't think I'm going to do the leather pouch class again. Two years ago, I actually took a class on Viking wire knitting, which I really enjoyed and have since then done a bit more research on it, including on how to finish pieces so they look polished. I think I could do a good class on that now, but I don't know if the woman who taught it two years ago will be doing it again. I suppose I could try to do something scribal, but I still feel tentative enough with my own scribal stuff that I'm not really confident enough to teach on that yet. I'd love to do something suitable to a Rus persona, but most of my Rus stuff has been garb related, and a novice schola is perhaps not the best venue for that kind of thing. I'm also doing a bit more with Italian garb.

I think one of my biggest obstacles to doing classes is that I tend to rely on the research of others that I have gleaned mostly off of their websites, so I'm not sure what I can add to it to make it *mine*. Even with the kumihimo class, I borrowed (with permission) a handout from someone else.

So those of you who teach SCA classes, when you are teaching a skill that you learned from someone else, how do you make it your own?
danagryphon: (Default)
I got my yearly email from the Bergental Novice Schola class wrangler, asking if I wanted to teach this year. Last year, I had a conflict with something, I think it was scouts, or maybe another event. This year, despite being on my birthday, I think I'm going to go and teach a couple of classes. Now to figure out what to teach.

I think I definitely want to do Beginning Kumihimo again, it went well last time and was a very satisfying class to teach, since the student got to take something tangible home, and one of them even finished the bracelet she'd started in the class before the event was over.

However, I don't think I'm going to do the leather pouch class again. Two years ago, I actually took a class on Viking wire knitting, which I really enjoyed and have since then done a bit more research on it, including on how to finish pieces so they look polished. I think I could do a good class on that now, but I don't know if the woman who taught it two years ago will be doing it again. I suppose I could try to do something scribal, but I still feel tentative enough with my own scribal stuff that I'm not really confident enough to teach on that yet. I'd love to do something suitable to a Rus persona, but most of my Rus stuff has been garb related, and a novice schola is perhaps not the best venue for that kind of thing. I'm also doing a bit more with Italian garb.

I think one of my biggest obstacles to doing classes is that I tend to rely on the research of others that I have gleaned mostly off of their websites, so I'm not sure what I can add to it to make it *mine*. Even with the kumihimo class, I borrowed (with permission) a handout from someone else.

So those of you who teach SCA classes, when you are teaching a skill that you learned from someone else, how do you make it your own?
danagryphon: (Default)
I got an email this morning from the Bergental Schola people asking if I wanted to teach again this year. Last year, in my first foray into teaching in the SCA (I did it for 5 years for a living), I taught two classes, Beginning Kumihimo and Making a Simple Leather Belt Pouch. Both classes were well attended and the attendees seemed pleased with their results.

I definitely would like to do it again (although that is the same weekend as NAA Nationals, hmmm), but I'm not sure what classes to teach. I don't think I should do exactly the same ones, although there may be people who didn't get to (or weren't around) take them last year.

Other class ideas I have are:
  1. Advanced Kumihimo (teaching a different pattern than the basic one)
  2. Leather Tooling (although would be hard to do as a hands-on class)
  3. Russian pearl embroidery (although I've just started doing this myself)
  4. History of the Mongol Invasion of Russia (although I dislike straight lecture classes)
  5. Russian garb
For those of you who know me and my various interests/hobbies, what classes do you think would be most interesting for a Schola aimed primarily at novices, but still appeal to someone who's been in the SCA for a while?
danagryphon: (Default)
I got an email this morning from the Bergental Schola people asking if I wanted to teach again this year. Last year, in my first foray into teaching in the SCA (I did it for 5 years for a living), I taught two classes, Beginning Kumihimo and Making a Simple Leather Belt Pouch. Both classes were well attended and the attendees seemed pleased with their results.

I definitely would like to do it again (although that is the same weekend as NAA Nationals, hmmm), but I'm not sure what classes to teach. I don't think I should do exactly the same ones, although there may be people who didn't get to (or weren't around) take them last year.

Other class ideas I have are:
  1. Advanced Kumihimo (teaching a different pattern than the basic one)
  2. Leather Tooling (although would be hard to do as a hands-on class)
  3. Russian pearl embroidery (although I've just started doing this myself)
  4. History of the Mongol Invasion of Russia (although I dislike straight lecture classes)
  5. Russian garb
For those of you who know me and my various interests/hobbies, what classes do you think would be most interesting for a Schola aimed primarily at novices, but still appeal to someone who's been in the SCA for a while?
danagryphon: (Arms)
I've decided it's time to start dipping my toes in the SCA teaching pond. Having been a teacher for several years, mundanely, I figure it's something I'm pretty comfortable with. So I'm teaching two classes at the Novice Schola in Bergental in February.

They are Beginning Kumihimo and Making a Simple Leather Beltpouch.

I've been doing Kumihimo since last May, so I feel like I can teach a beginning class. And it's a really cool way to make your own cords for lacing dresses, drawstrings for pouches, loops for buttons, ties for hats... a thousand and one uses, especially for someone starting out in the SCA. I'm going to make simple looms out of foam board to hand out, and I have a huge collection of DMC floss that I will never, ever use up by myself, so I'll be able to offer folks everything they need to start their first project. I'll probably also bring along my wooden marudai that I am building, to show them how easy it is to make a semi-authentic one if they want to pursue it further.

The other class is, of course, a leatherworking class. I haven't quite settled yet on which style of simple pouch I'm going to have them make. Either a round drawstring pouch, or a falconer's pouch. The round pouch has the virtue of requiring no sewing, but uses a lot of leather. Then again, I have a whole lot of leather I can basically donate to the cause, that was once the covering for a leather sofa. The falconer's pouch is a bit cooler, is easier to get into, but requires sewing, not just of the leather, but also of a metal ring into the top, and a loop to attach it to the belt. And I just don't have the materials to let a whole bunch of people (read, more than one!) sew leather. Hmmm. Sounds like the round pouch it will have to be. But I suppose I could make up a handout showing how to make other types of leather pouches. Yeah, that's the ticket.

I think the hardest part is going to be creating the handouts, since I feel like I should have some sort of documentation about these techniques, and research is definitely not my forte. Well, at least, not this kind of research. Suggestions will be heartily welcomed.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to these classes. I might also try teaching some more advanced leatherworking classes sometime at a EKU. I wonder if the BBM EKU is still looking for teachers.....
danagryphon: (Arms)
I've decided it's time to start dipping my toes in the SCA teaching pond. Having been a teacher for several years, mundanely, I figure it's something I'm pretty comfortable with. So I'm teaching two classes at the Novice Schola in Bergental in February.

They are Beginning Kumihimo and Making a Simple Leather Beltpouch.

I've been doing Kumihimo since last May, so I feel like I can teach a beginning class. And it's a really cool way to make your own cords for lacing dresses, drawstrings for pouches, loops for buttons, ties for hats... a thousand and one uses, especially for someone starting out in the SCA. I'm going to make simple looms out of foam board to hand out, and I have a huge collection of DMC floss that I will never, ever use up by myself, so I'll be able to offer folks everything they need to start their first project. I'll probably also bring along my wooden marudai that I am building, to show them how easy it is to make a semi-authentic one if they want to pursue it further.

The other class is, of course, a leatherworking class. I haven't quite settled yet on which style of simple pouch I'm going to have them make. Either a round drawstring pouch, or a falconer's pouch. The round pouch has the virtue of requiring no sewing, but uses a lot of leather. Then again, I have a whole lot of leather I can basically donate to the cause, that was once the covering for a leather sofa. The falconer's pouch is a bit cooler, is easier to get into, but requires sewing, not just of the leather, but also of a metal ring into the top, and a loop to attach it to the belt. And I just don't have the materials to let a whole bunch of people (read, more than one!) sew leather. Hmmm. Sounds like the round pouch it will have to be. But I suppose I could make up a handout showing how to make other types of leather pouches. Yeah, that's the ticket.

I think the hardest part is going to be creating the handouts, since I feel like I should have some sort of documentation about these techniques, and research is definitely not my forte. Well, at least, not this kind of research. Suggestions will be heartily welcomed.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to these classes. I might also try teaching some more advanced leatherworking classes sometime at a EKU. I wonder if the BBM EKU is still looking for teachers.....

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