danagryphon: (Arms)
Well, my recipient just posted that she received her package, so I can post a pic of the gift I made for the EK Artisan Swap (which is a sooper sekrit type of swap). She's a fellow archer who likes celtic knotwork and earthtones, especially green. So I made her a leather archery bracer with a gold and green celtic knot and a green variegated archer's tassel.

EK Artisan Swap gift

Although this was the fourth round of this swap, it was my first time participating. It was very cool, and I'm looking forward to seeing what goody I get in return. And it's something I'll definitely do again when the next round starts up!
danagryphon: (Arms)
So it's been a crazy month. All the stuff that didn't get done for Birka, I really, really tried to get done for K&Q A&S yesterday. I mostly succeeded, and the couple of things that didn't get done (or didn't quite get finished) for then I can do in the next week or so.

And then, there was this Laureling. The day before Christmas, I got an email from [livejournal.com profile] brokk, telling me that [livejournal.com profile] xandra_rozina was going to be elevated to the Laural at K&Q A&S, and could I help make sure she would go to the event by asking her to carpool with me, since we have carpooled to these kinds of events in the past. Oh, and what else did he need to do?

Cut for images and insane rambling )

Then on to the next round of projects!
danagryphon: (Arms)
Birka was, as usual, a whirlwind. (For my non-SCA friends, this is a weekend long SCA con event with a theme inspired by the Viking marketplace called Birka.)

Cut for images and much rambling )
danagryphon: (Default)
I finally finished the last two pieces for the big leatherwork commission, a side quiver and archery bracer. These go with the belt pouch and book I posted a couple of weeks ago. They all are decorated with customer's house arms. She asked to have the bracer done in red because it signifies her as a member of some archery company out West. This is the first time I've made a side quiver (instead of a back quiver). I'm pretty happy with the design and how it came out, and will definitely put that in my repertoire of patterns for the future.


danagryphon: (Default)
I finally finished the last two pieces for the big leatherwork commission, a side quiver and archery bracer. These go with the belt pouch and book I posted a couple of weeks ago. They all are decorated with customer's house arms. She asked to have the bracer done in red because it signifies her as a member of some archery company out West. This is the first time I've made a side quiver (instead of a back quiver). I'm pretty happy with the design and how it came out, and will definitely put that in my repertoire of patterns for the future.


danagryphon: (Default)
This is the first part of a large commission I'm working on. I'm pretty happy with how the tooling came out. Still working on a matching bracer and quiver.




danagryphon: (Default)
This is the first part of a large commission I'm working on. I'm pretty happy with how the tooling came out. Still working on a matching bracer and quiver.




danagryphon: (Scribal)
So the last couple of weeks have mostly involved me working on a couple of projects for Coronation. First, I had a scroll assignment, an AoA for Duke Randall and Duchess Katherine's son, Brian le Wolfhunt, an extraordinary young man who is about 14 or 15, I believe.

It was inspired by this 15th c. French manuscript.


The other project was to make a vigil book for my friend [livejournal.com profile] sfandra  who was elevated to the Order of the Laurel (peerage level award for arts). I kid that she is my Russian sister, since we both have the same patronymic in our SCA names (we are both children of Dmitri). She has a Russian firebird design she likes, so I did that on the front cover, surrounded by a laurel wreath, and then put her arms on the back. This was my first book, and I did it with a limp binding, using 5 signatures of 8 regular sheets of nice quality resume paper folded in half. That gave a total of 160 pages. I am really pleased with how both the tooling for the covers and the binding itself came out.

danagryphon: (Scribal)
So the last couple of weeks have mostly involved me working on a couple of projects for Coronation. First, I had a scroll assignment, an AoA for Duke Randall and Duchess Katherine's son, Brian le Wolfhunt, an extraordinary young man who is about 14 or 15, I believe.

It was inspired by this 15th c. French manuscript.


The other project was to make a vigil book for my friend [livejournal.com profile] sfandra  who was elevated to the Order of the Laurel (peerage level award for arts). I kid that she is my Russian sister, since we both have the same patronymic in our SCA names (we are both children of Dmitri). She has a Russian firebird design she likes, so I did that on the front cover, surrounded by a laurel wreath, and then put her arms on the back. This was my first book, and I did it with a limp binding, using 5 signatures of 8 regular sheets of nice quality resume paper folded in half. That gave a total of 160 pages. I am really pleased with how both the tooling for the covers and the binding itself came out.

danagryphon: (Default)
Yeah, because I need a new hobby like I need a hole in the head.

But this one has a purpose. I'm making a book. It started out because I'm tooling this awesomely cool cover, but the thought of then putting my awesomely cool cover over a commercial blank journal just goes against the grain (pun intended... hardy har har)

Anyway, I've watched a couple of video tutorials on "limp binding" and found a couple of handouts about it online. It looks like the most straightforward book binding technique, and one I can do with the materials I already have on hand and the time remaining to do it.

One remaining question is how big and how many signatures to do. It looks like the average commercial blank journal has 160 pages, which means 80 sheets. I'm using regular 8 1/2 x 11 paper (well, high quality resume paper), folded in half. So if I do 5 signatures, they need to each have 16 sheets once they are folded in half, or 8 sheets before folding. Which is actually a pretty standard signature in publishing these days. And seems a pretty reasonable size that I can fold and punch an awl through.

The other remaining question is how thick of leather I should use. Most limp binding is done with pretty thin, supple leather, so that it folds easily to form a spine. However, I need something slightly thicker in order to be able to do the tooling I want on it. One though I had was to do two thicker sections for the front and back covers, glued onto a thinner layer of leather that wraps all the way around and forms the spine. Especially if I use commercially dyed thinner leather, it will help form a nice interior to the covers.

Well, it'll be an interesting challenge.
danagryphon: (Default)
Yeah, because I need a new hobby like I need a hole in the head.

But this one has a purpose. I'm making a book. It started out because I'm tooling this awesomely cool cover, but the thought of then putting my awesomely cool cover over a commercial blank journal just goes against the grain (pun intended... hardy har har)

Anyway, I've watched a couple of video tutorials on "limp binding" and found a couple of handouts about it online. It looks like the most straightforward book binding technique, and one I can do with the materials I already have on hand and the time remaining to do it.

One remaining question is how big and how many signatures to do. It looks like the average commercial blank journal has 160 pages, which means 80 sheets. I'm using regular 8 1/2 x 11 paper (well, high quality resume paper), folded in half. So if I do 5 signatures, they need to each have 16 sheets once they are folded in half, or 8 sheets before folding. Which is actually a pretty standard signature in publishing these days. And seems a pretty reasonable size that I can fold and punch an awl through.

The other remaining question is how thick of leather I should use. Most limp binding is done with pretty thin, supple leather, so that it folds easily to form a spine. However, I need something slightly thicker in order to be able to do the tooling I want on it. One though I had was to do two thicker sections for the front and back covers, glued onto a thinner layer of leather that wraps all the way around and forms the spine. Especially if I use commercially dyed thinner leather, it will help form a nice interior to the covers.

Well, it'll be an interesting challenge.
danagryphon: (Sagittarius)
Here are some pics of Antonio's quiver, finished over the weekend. I'm pleased, and so is he. He is going shooting with it tonight (and I may or may not be there with him, depending on whether I hear back from Li about going to his place tonight), so we'll see how well it works for him. We are also going to try to have a regular Shire practice on Thursday night as well. I did acanthus leaves instead of knotwork like I have on mine, because I thought it was more apropos of his Italian persona. And I'll throw in a picture of his bracer, as well, for comparison. For some reason, the blue dye on the bracer came out much darker than the quiver, despite being from the same bottle.

danagryphon: (Sagittarius)
Here are some pics of Antonio's quiver, finished over the weekend. I'm pleased, and so is he. He is going shooting with it tonight (and I may or may not be there with him, depending on whether I hear back from Li about going to his place tonight), so we'll see how well it works for him. We are also going to try to have a regular Shire practice on Thursday night as well. I did acanthus leaves instead of knotwork like I have on mine, because I thought it was more apropos of his Italian persona. And I'll throw in a picture of his bracer, as well, for comparison. For some reason, the blue dye on the bracer came out much darker than the quiver, despite being from the same bottle.

danagryphon: (Fuzzy Mama)
I finished Antonio's back quiver. Yay! I took some pics, but having pulled them off the camera yet. I'll try to post them tonight or tomorrow. It turned out well, the gold painted fox and acanthus leaves look awesome against the dark blue dyed leather. And all the gold hardware and the white rabbit fur lining looks faboo. He's going to go shooting with it a couple of times this week down at Hoops so he can get used to it before Roses this weekend.

I started on a couple of other projects as well. E will need some more tunics if he is going to start coming with us to weekend camping events this summer. If B decides he wants to, which he doesn't seem inclined to, I can loan him some of mine, since he and I are now about the same size! But E now has one winter weight tunic and one summer weight tunic (recently made, too, after he grew out of his old summer weight one). I started another tunic in a sage green, from some leftover fabric from one of my tunics, and will also make him a blue tunic that is a little fancier, so he will have something for court, should he need it. I need to figure out one more after that (maybe yellow... I'll have to see if he has a preference), and a couple of undertunics. But I have until Sommer Draw to finish those.

I have a feeling I may end up loaning Antonio some tunics for Roses; he has put on a little weight in the last year, and I think a lot of his older tunics are now too small. I may also have to put some gussets in his fencing tunic. We also have to drag the tent out and patch the hole in the floor before this weekend.

I think I'm going to end up taking Wednesday off to get some things done, including having my car serviced before the big drive, repairing the tent, and that would also let me help out taking E and his den on a little field trip to finish up their World Conservation award. Things are kind of quiet around work right now, so hopefully that won't be a problem. I'm also going to work from home on Friday, since the office will almost certainly close early like they always do before a holiday weekend, which will let M and I get a bit of a jump on the weekend traffic heading to NY (hahahahahah).
danagryphon: (Fuzzy Mama)
I finished Antonio's back quiver. Yay! I took some pics, but having pulled them off the camera yet. I'll try to post them tonight or tomorrow. It turned out well, the gold painted fox and acanthus leaves look awesome against the dark blue dyed leather. And all the gold hardware and the white rabbit fur lining looks faboo. He's going to go shooting with it a couple of times this week down at Hoops so he can get used to it before Roses this weekend.

I started on a couple of other projects as well. E will need some more tunics if he is going to start coming with us to weekend camping events this summer. If B decides he wants to, which he doesn't seem inclined to, I can loan him some of mine, since he and I are now about the same size! But E now has one winter weight tunic and one summer weight tunic (recently made, too, after he grew out of his old summer weight one). I started another tunic in a sage green, from some leftover fabric from one of my tunics, and will also make him a blue tunic that is a little fancier, so he will have something for court, should he need it. I need to figure out one more after that (maybe yellow... I'll have to see if he has a preference), and a couple of undertunics. But I have until Sommer Draw to finish those.

I have a feeling I may end up loaning Antonio some tunics for Roses; he has put on a little weight in the last year, and I think a lot of his older tunics are now too small. I may also have to put some gussets in his fencing tunic. We also have to drag the tent out and patch the hole in the floor before this weekend.

I think I'm going to end up taking Wednesday off to get some things done, including having my car serviced before the big drive, repairing the tent, and that would also let me help out taking E and his den on a little field trip to finish up their World Conservation award. Things are kind of quiet around work right now, so hopefully that won't be a problem. I'm also going to work from home on Friday, since the office will almost certainly close early like they always do before a holiday weekend, which will let M and I get a bit of a jump on the weekend traffic heading to NY (hahahahahah).
danagryphon: (Arms)
I've decided it's time to start dipping my toes in the SCA teaching pond. Having been a teacher for several years, mundanely, I figure it's something I'm pretty comfortable with. So I'm teaching two classes at the Novice Schola in Bergental in February.

They are Beginning Kumihimo and Making a Simple Leather Beltpouch.

I've been doing Kumihimo since last May, so I feel like I can teach a beginning class. And it's a really cool way to make your own cords for lacing dresses, drawstrings for pouches, loops for buttons, ties for hats... a thousand and one uses, especially for someone starting out in the SCA. I'm going to make simple looms out of foam board to hand out, and I have a huge collection of DMC floss that I will never, ever use up by myself, so I'll be able to offer folks everything they need to start their first project. I'll probably also bring along my wooden marudai that I am building, to show them how easy it is to make a semi-authentic one if they want to pursue it further.

The other class is, of course, a leatherworking class. I haven't quite settled yet on which style of simple pouch I'm going to have them make. Either a round drawstring pouch, or a falconer's pouch. The round pouch has the virtue of requiring no sewing, but uses a lot of leather. Then again, I have a whole lot of leather I can basically donate to the cause, that was once the covering for a leather sofa. The falconer's pouch is a bit cooler, is easier to get into, but requires sewing, not just of the leather, but also of a metal ring into the top, and a loop to attach it to the belt. And I just don't have the materials to let a whole bunch of people (read, more than one!) sew leather. Hmmm. Sounds like the round pouch it will have to be. But I suppose I could make up a handout showing how to make other types of leather pouches. Yeah, that's the ticket.

I think the hardest part is going to be creating the handouts, since I feel like I should have some sort of documentation about these techniques, and research is definitely not my forte. Well, at least, not this kind of research. Suggestions will be heartily welcomed.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to these classes. I might also try teaching some more advanced leatherworking classes sometime at a EKU. I wonder if the BBM EKU is still looking for teachers.....
danagryphon: (Arms)
I've decided it's time to start dipping my toes in the SCA teaching pond. Having been a teacher for several years, mundanely, I figure it's something I'm pretty comfortable with. So I'm teaching two classes at the Novice Schola in Bergental in February.

They are Beginning Kumihimo and Making a Simple Leather Beltpouch.

I've been doing Kumihimo since last May, so I feel like I can teach a beginning class. And it's a really cool way to make your own cords for lacing dresses, drawstrings for pouches, loops for buttons, ties for hats... a thousand and one uses, especially for someone starting out in the SCA. I'm going to make simple looms out of foam board to hand out, and I have a huge collection of DMC floss that I will never, ever use up by myself, so I'll be able to offer folks everything they need to start their first project. I'll probably also bring along my wooden marudai that I am building, to show them how easy it is to make a semi-authentic one if they want to pursue it further.

The other class is, of course, a leatherworking class. I haven't quite settled yet on which style of simple pouch I'm going to have them make. Either a round drawstring pouch, or a falconer's pouch. The round pouch has the virtue of requiring no sewing, but uses a lot of leather. Then again, I have a whole lot of leather I can basically donate to the cause, that was once the covering for a leather sofa. The falconer's pouch is a bit cooler, is easier to get into, but requires sewing, not just of the leather, but also of a metal ring into the top, and a loop to attach it to the belt. And I just don't have the materials to let a whole bunch of people (read, more than one!) sew leather. Hmmm. Sounds like the round pouch it will have to be. But I suppose I could make up a handout showing how to make other types of leather pouches. Yeah, that's the ticket.

I think the hardest part is going to be creating the handouts, since I feel like I should have some sort of documentation about these techniques, and research is definitely not my forte. Well, at least, not this kind of research. Suggestions will be heartily welcomed.

Anyway, I'm looking forward to these classes. I might also try teaching some more advanced leatherworking classes sometime at a EKU. I wonder if the BBM EKU is still looking for teachers.....
danagryphon: (Discourse Hand)
A friend of mine was lamenting the fact that she is acquiring yarn for projects to be done in the future. I've been collecting fabric for projects as long as I have been sewing, and of course, have lately added new craft areas with their own batch of incomplete projects. So I though I would make a list to help myself remember what I need to work on:

Sewing projects )

Leatherworking )

Needlework/Embroidery/Kumihimo/Beadwork )

Painting/Scribal )

Woodworking )

This, of course, doesn't even get into the list of things that are just "repairs", like our cabin tent that has a hole in the floor along a seam.
danagryphon: (Discourse Hand)
A friend of mine was lamenting the fact that she is acquiring yarn for projects to be done in the future. I've been collecting fabric for projects as long as I have been sewing, and of course, have lately added new craft areas with their own batch of incomplete projects. So I though I would make a list to help myself remember what I need to work on:

Sewing projects )

Leatherworking )

Needlework/Embroidery/Kumihimo/Beadwork )

Painting/Scribal )

Woodworking )

This, of course, doesn't even get into the list of things that are just "repairs", like our cabin tent that has a hole in the floor along a seam.

Leatherwork

Sep. 5th, 2007 02:44 pm
danagryphon: (Gryphon Art)

Here's what I did over the weekend....

This is a commission for a backquiver and archery bracer that I am going to deliver at the Crossroads event in just under two weeks.

The customer is a teenage boy, and wanted black leather with a snowy owl and white knotwork (which you can just see the edge of on the quiver), and white lacing. I still have to put buckles on the side straps to make it adustable, since as a teenage boy, he will probably still grow some.

I'm pretty happy with the way the tooling turned out, and it even doesn't reek of Harry Potter. :)

Now I just have to finish those scrolls....

 

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