danagryphon: (Triquetra)
It's been a hell of a couple of weeks. Two weeks ago, I drove down to PA to tend to my critically ill father. A week ago, I sat in his hospital room watching tragedy unfold in my home town, two blocks from where I work. Dad was released from the hospital Thursday; Friday night, I sat at my sister's house and watched a manhunt lock down Boston and for a time, center a block from my husband's work.

The visiting nurse came on Friday and shared with us that the physical therapist had texted her the last day he had been here, when he discovered that Dad was on the verge of organ failure. He had texted her, "My patient is dying in front of my eyes, and he is willing to just accept it. I don't know what to do. This is the worst day of my career." Luckily, he was able to help us convince Dad to go to the hospital that day and, without a doubt, saved his life.

Dad had pnemonia and congestive heart failure. Both completely treatable with medications. And today he is on his way to a full recovery.

The two men responsible for Monday's bombings in Boston are no longer at large. My office building is open, but still adjacent to a massive crime scene. I am not there, and won't be for at least another week, but I'll never be able to walk past that section of sidewalk again without thinking of those bloodstains.

But today, I am thankful. I am thankful for Erik the physical therapist and LoriAnn the visiting nurse. I'm thanking for Sean Collier's sacrifice in the line of duty and the tireless efforts of the LEOs who performed a miracle in four days. I'm thankful for the amazing medical community in Boston. I'm thankful that my friends are all safe, and that I work and have lived in a city full of people that will NEVER "spen[d] the night cowering in their homes wishing they had an AR-15 with a hi-capacity magazine". We are Bostonians. We will not be intimidated. Instead, we will gather in the streets after the storm and sing praises. Today, I am thankful.
danagryphon: (Triquetra)
Bummer. SF pioneering author Harry Harrison died today at the age of 87.

Although I never read much of his stuff, the Eden trilogy was very formative of the style of science fiction I like to write.

Time to go dust off some of his other stuff, I think.
danagryphon: (Triquetra)
Bummer. SF pioneering author Harry Harrison died today at the age of 87.

Although I never read much of his stuff, the Eden trilogy was very formative of the style of science fiction I like to write.

Time to go dust off some of his other stuff, I think.

25 Years

Jan. 24th, 2012 12:41 pm
danagryphon: (Triquetra)
Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of Brett's death. I spent much of the day trying not to think about it. We went out last night for Hubby's bday, which is actually Wednesday. All in all, it was a quiet evening.

Brett Luther Anspach
Aug. 19, 1964 - Jan. 23, 1986

Be at peace, beloved.

25 Years

Jan. 24th, 2012 12:41 pm
danagryphon: (Triquetra)
Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of Brett's death. I spent much of the day trying not to think about it. We went out last night for Hubby's bday, which is actually Wednesday. All in all, it was a quiet evening.

Brett Luther Anspach
Aug. 19, 1964 - Jan. 23, 1986

Be at peace, beloved.
danagryphon: (Guard)
This weekend was productive and busy, if a little melancholy. The boys were with us this weekend, and Saturday, we took them to the Masonic Heritage Museum in Lexington, to see the new Jim Henson exhibit that just opened. It was a nice exhibit, and the boys enjoyed the museum in general. The other special exhibit they have right now is called Seeds of Liberty, and was of special interest to E, who just finished studying the Revolutionary War (and Paul Revere for his special project).

The Jim Henson exhibit was really interesting to me. I had not known he was quite an accomplished drawing artist, nor did I know about all the work he did before Muppets hit it big. The Dark Crystal portion was very cool, also. The melancholy came because it made me miss my friend Brett, that was one of the big things that brought us together as friends was our love of Muppets, and puppetry in general, since we were in a performing puppet group together in high school. And just the circumstances of Henson's death were particularly sad. He was far too young when he was taken from us, from something that should not have taken him. We picked up a couple of things in the gift shop, including a t-shirt for B of Cookie Monster, that said "Make Cookies, Not War".

We went home intending to watch Dark Crystal on DVD, but it was no where to be found. We think that somehow a box of DVD's got lost when we moved to the condo, since there have been several movies (mostly for the kids) that we KNOW we owned, that never turned up when we unpacked. So we watched The Muppet Movie instead. Unfortunately, I couldn't get past the opening song, Rainbow Connection, without bursting into tears. After that, it was a little easier, but some things are never going to be easy for me to watch or listen to.

Saturday, I also made a lot of progress on rearranging the basement. I got the daybed moved down there and reassembled, so that isn't sitting in my living room anymore! We also set up the computer that M's parents gave us for the boys a year ago when they left for their wandering ways. It's still an old Pent III, but unlike their current Pent III that is running Windows ME (blech!), this one is running XP, and have MS Office on it, so B can do his homework in Word and Excel. The only bummer is that it doesn't have a wireless card like I thought it did, and it is on the other side of the room from the router. I was going to get an ethernet cable, but Himself suggested a USB wireless adaptor. So I'm going to look into that. It certainly would be nice to have everything wireless.

B's basement bedroom is going to be nice, I think. In addition to the bed, I got the desk set up, just to get the furniture rearranged and out of the way. He won't move down there until the drywall has been done, which we still do in May. But it's enough to see that once we get him a wardrobe and dresser from Ikea for in there, he will have a nice little bedroom, not too crowded, and he won't have to share it with his little brother! The old refrigerator has also been moved to it's permanent spot, and that is working out nicely, too, so that's definitely a keeper.

Sunday, [livejournal.com profile] chrystie69  and S came down for ham dinner, so that was fun. I got lots done on embroidering the tabards for the Queen's guard which have to be done for Saturday. I'm going to take a vacation day on Friday, because I'd also really like to make myself a new tunic for Coronation (I want something springy but still somewhat fancy, and everything I have that is fancy is definitely winter wear). Tonight, [livejournal.com profile] uxbridgefox  is coming up to hand off more tabards for me to do applique and embroidery on, and take the ones that are done to do edging and finishing work. Man, are they going to look spiffy! I can't wait to see the Queen's face when she sees them!
danagryphon: (Guard)
This weekend was productive and busy, if a little melancholy. The boys were with us this weekend, and Saturday, we took them to the Masonic Heritage Museum in Lexington, to see the new Jim Henson exhibit that just opened. It was a nice exhibit, and the boys enjoyed the museum in general. The other special exhibit they have right now is called Seeds of Liberty, and was of special interest to E, who just finished studying the Revolutionary War (and Paul Revere for his special project).

The Jim Henson exhibit was really interesting to me. I had not known he was quite an accomplished drawing artist, nor did I know about all the work he did before Muppets hit it big. The Dark Crystal portion was very cool, also. The melancholy came because it made me miss my friend Brett, that was one of the big things that brought us together as friends was our love of Muppets, and puppetry in general, since we were in a performing puppet group together in high school. And just the circumstances of Henson's death were particularly sad. He was far too young when he was taken from us, from something that should not have taken him. We picked up a couple of things in the gift shop, including a t-shirt for B of Cookie Monster, that said "Make Cookies, Not War".

We went home intending to watch Dark Crystal on DVD, but it was no where to be found. We think that somehow a box of DVD's got lost when we moved to the condo, since there have been several movies (mostly for the kids) that we KNOW we owned, that never turned up when we unpacked. So we watched The Muppet Movie instead. Unfortunately, I couldn't get past the opening song, Rainbow Connection, without bursting into tears. After that, it was a little easier, but some things are never going to be easy for me to watch or listen to.

Saturday, I also made a lot of progress on rearranging the basement. I got the daybed moved down there and reassembled, so that isn't sitting in my living room anymore! We also set up the computer that M's parents gave us for the boys a year ago when they left for their wandering ways. It's still an old Pent III, but unlike their current Pent III that is running Windows ME (blech!), this one is running XP, and have MS Office on it, so B can do his homework in Word and Excel. The only bummer is that it doesn't have a wireless card like I thought it did, and it is on the other side of the room from the router. I was going to get an ethernet cable, but Himself suggested a USB wireless adaptor. So I'm going to look into that. It certainly would be nice to have everything wireless.

B's basement bedroom is going to be nice, I think. In addition to the bed, I got the desk set up, just to get the furniture rearranged and out of the way. He won't move down there until the drywall has been done, which we still do in May. But it's enough to see that once we get him a wardrobe and dresser from Ikea for in there, he will have a nice little bedroom, not too crowded, and he won't have to share it with his little brother! The old refrigerator has also been moved to it's permanent spot, and that is working out nicely, too, so that's definitely a keeper.

Sunday, [livejournal.com profile] chrystie69  and S came down for ham dinner, so that was fun. I got lots done on embroidering the tabards for the Queen's guard which have to be done for Saturday. I'm going to take a vacation day on Friday, because I'd also really like to make myself a new tunic for Coronation (I want something springy but still somewhat fancy, and everything I have that is fancy is definitely winter wear). Tonight, [livejournal.com profile] uxbridgefox  is coming up to hand off more tabards for me to do applique and embroidery on, and take the ones that are done to do edging and finishing work. Man, are they going to look spiffy! I can't wait to see the Queen's face when she sees them!
danagryphon: (Triquetra)
BUT A MOMENT
by Mary Travers/Noel Paul Stookey
(Peter, Paul, and Mary)

Memory moves us past each other
Time is a ribbon without end
Love is the lesson we keep learning
Death but a moment we must spend

Last week as I made our lunch
We talked of yesterdays
I remember more than you
That happens lots these days
But how we laughed, I almost cried
And the afternoon flew by
As we sat on the patio sipping our drinks
And the sunlight began to die

Memory moves us past each other
Time is a ribbon without an end
Love is the lesson we keep learning
Death but a moment we must spend

And we try to give each other comfort
We try to hold off that dark night
Each of us careful of the other
Keeping our own fear out of sight

Ah, you know I've always loved you
And I know you've loved me too
So it's hard to watch you crumble
And forget all that you knew

Yesterday while I was driving
Sunlight streaming through the trees
Suddenly my heartache parted
And suddenly I felt at ease
You will love me all your life
And I will love you all of mine
That's the gift we give each other
That's the gift divine

Memory moves us past each other
Though time is a ribbon without an end
Love's still the lesson we keep learning
And death but a moment we must spend
danagryphon: (Triquetra)
BUT A MOMENT
by Mary Travers/Noel Paul Stookey
(Peter, Paul, and Mary)

Memory moves us past each other
Time is a ribbon without end
Love is the lesson we keep learning
Death but a moment we must spend

Last week as I made our lunch
We talked of yesterdays
I remember more than you
That happens lots these days
But how we laughed, I almost cried
And the afternoon flew by
As we sat on the patio sipping our drinks
And the sunlight began to die

Memory moves us past each other
Time is a ribbon without an end
Love is the lesson we keep learning
Death but a moment we must spend

And we try to give each other comfort
We try to hold off that dark night
Each of us careful of the other
Keeping our own fear out of sight

Ah, you know I've always loved you
And I know you've loved me too
So it's hard to watch you crumble
And forget all that you knew

Yesterday while I was driving
Sunlight streaming through the trees
Suddenly my heartache parted
And suddenly I felt at ease
You will love me all your life
And I will love you all of mine
That's the gift we give each other
That's the gift divine

Memory moves us past each other
Though time is a ribbon without an end
Love's still the lesson we keep learning
And death but a moment we must spend

RIP

Jun. 2nd, 2009 09:24 am
danagryphon: (Triquetra)
Dr. Tiller believed that "patients are emotionally, mentally, morally, spiritually and physically competent to struggle with complex health issues and come to decisions that are appropriate for them."

I spent part of yesterday reading stories of women who had late-term abortions performed by Dr. Tiller, because they were going to have babies doomed to short, painful lives with no quality whatsoever. Why is it that we are willing to alleviate the suffering of our pets, but to seek to prevent the suffering of a child is somehow wrong?

Abortion is a heartbreaking choice. Women make it for many reasons. One soundbite used by pro-choice people is "If you can't trust a woman to make decisions about her body, how can you trust her with a baby?" And yes, it's a soundbite, but it gets to a deeper root of this issue. Either you think that women are competent to make appropriate decisions for themselves, or you don't. Ultimately, it is the woman who has to find a peace with her decision, however tenuous it may be. And who, just who, does anyone think they are to have the hubris to not only question that choice, but to tell them that the peace that they have reached is murderous?

Late-term abortions are the standard that the anti-choice folks wave as their primary argument against all abortions. They claim that they are being done willy-nilly, without careful consideration, for reasons of convenience. They are not. Yes, there may be some late-term abortions being done for no real medical reason (which *is* illegal), because human beings will always find a way to be destructive.

But the vast, vast majority of women make this choice after thoughtful consideration, with a heavy heart. Most of them make it quickly, during the first trimester, unless there are very extenuating circumstances. Most people who favor choice also would like to see that choice rarely needed, because of better education, better access to birth control, including sterilizations, and better methods of birth control. Because either you believe that given a better set of choices, women will make the best choice for them, or you don't.

Dr. Tiller got that. He had the respect for his patients, for women, to respect their choices. And he was killed for it.

Thank you, Dr. Tiller, for your service to women. Rest in peace.

RIP

Jun. 2nd, 2009 09:24 am
danagryphon: (Triquetra)
Dr. Tiller believed that "patients are emotionally, mentally, morally, spiritually and physically competent to struggle with complex health issues and come to decisions that are appropriate for them."

I spent part of yesterday reading stories of women who had late-term abortions performed by Dr. Tiller, because they were going to have babies doomed to short, painful lives with no quality whatsoever. Why is it that we are willing to alleviate the suffering of our pets, but to seek to prevent the suffering of a child is somehow wrong?

Abortion is a heartbreaking choice. Women make it for many reasons. One soundbite used by pro-choice people is "If you can't trust a woman to make decisions about her body, how can you trust her with a baby?" And yes, it's a soundbite, but it gets to a deeper root of this issue. Either you think that women are competent to make appropriate decisions for themselves, or you don't. Ultimately, it is the woman who has to find a peace with her decision, however tenuous it may be. And who, just who, does anyone think they are to have the hubris to not only question that choice, but to tell them that the peace that they have reached is murderous?

Late-term abortions are the standard that the anti-choice folks wave as their primary argument against all abortions. They claim that they are being done willy-nilly, without careful consideration, for reasons of convenience. They are not. Yes, there may be some late-term abortions being done for no real medical reason (which *is* illegal), because human beings will always find a way to be destructive.

But the vast, vast majority of women make this choice after thoughtful consideration, with a heavy heart. Most of them make it quickly, during the first trimester, unless there are very extenuating circumstances. Most people who favor choice also would like to see that choice rarely needed, because of better education, better access to birth control, including sterilizations, and better methods of birth control. Because either you believe that given a better set of choices, women will make the best choice for them, or you don't.

Dr. Tiller got that. He had the respect for his patients, for women, to respect their choices. And he was killed for it.

Thank you, Dr. Tiller, for your service to women. Rest in peace.

danagryphon: (Pentagram)
Forrest Ackerman, the world's biggest science fiction fan, died over the weekend at 92.

He was much revered and much talked about at MITSFS (the MIT science fiction society). I believe at one point, he made quite a large donation to the library there, which, to the best of my knowledge, still boasts the largest open shelf collection of science fiction in the world.
danagryphon: (Pentagram)
Forrest Ackerman, the world's biggest science fiction fan, died over the weekend at 92.

He was much revered and much talked about at MITSFS (the MIT science fiction society). I believe at one point, he made quite a large donation to the library there, which, to the best of my knowledge, still boasts the largest open shelf collection of science fiction in the world.
danagryphon: (triquetra)
While watching the news for my sons' school closing yesterday morning, I heard that Dan Fogelberg passed away over the weekend. He had battled advanced prostate cancer for four years, but lost that battle on Sunday, at age 56.

I first heard of Dan in 1981, when my mom bought me The Innocent Age for Christmas. I have no idea why she picked that album, since I had not asked for it, but I'm glad she did. I instantly fell in love with his music, and by the time I left for college a year and a half later, I owned everything he had recorded up to that point. His music is mostly ballads, with messages of love, peace, spirituality, and strength. His music shaped my taste in music for years, and make up the largest set of songs by one artist on my MP3 player today. Some of those songs also sustained me through a lot of unpleasant times.

In the summer of 1985, he came to Boston and had a concert on the Common. My best friend Brett and his wife were visiting, and we all went to see it. It was the only time I had ever seen Dan in concert, and it is still one of my best memories. That concert was also the last one I saw with Brett; he committed suicide about 6 months later.

May you rest in peace, Dan, in a place of no suffering, where the air is forever filled with music.

The world is less bright with your passing.


Nether Lands

High on this mountain
The clouds down below
I'm feeling so strong and alive
From this rocky perch
I'll continue to search
For the wind and the snow and the sky
Oh I want a lover and I want some friends
And I want to live in the sun
And I want to do all the things that I never have done
Sunny bright mornings and pale moonlit nights
Keep me from feeling alone
Now I'm learning to fly and this freedom is like
Nothing that I've ever known
Oh I've seen the bottom and I've been on top
But mostly I've lived in between
And where do you go when you get to the end of your dream
Off in the Nether Lands I heard the sound
Like the beating of heavenly wings
And deep in my brain I can hear a refrain
Of my soul as she rises and sings
Anthems to glory and anthems to love
And hymns filled with earthly delight
Like the songs that the darkness composes to worship the light
Once in a vision I came on some woods
And stood at a fork in the road
My choices were clear yet I froze with the fear
Of not knowing which way to go
Oh, one road was simple acceptance of life
The other road offered sweet peace
When I made my decision
My vision became my release
danagryphon: (triquetra)
While watching the news for my sons' school closing yesterday morning, I heard that Dan Fogelberg passed away over the weekend. He had battled advanced prostate cancer for four years, but lost that battle on Sunday, at age 56.

I first heard of Dan in 1981, when my mom bought me The Innocent Age for Christmas. I have no idea why she picked that album, since I had not asked for it, but I'm glad she did. I instantly fell in love with his music, and by the time I left for college a year and a half later, I owned everything he had recorded up to that point. His music is mostly ballads, with messages of love, peace, spirituality, and strength. His music shaped my taste in music for years, and make up the largest set of songs by one artist on my MP3 player today. Some of those songs also sustained me through a lot of unpleasant times.

In the summer of 1985, he came to Boston and had a concert on the Common. My best friend Brett and his wife were visiting, and we all went to see it. It was the only time I had ever seen Dan in concert, and it is still one of my best memories. That concert was also the last one I saw with Brett; he committed suicide about 6 months later.

May you rest in peace, Dan, in a place of no suffering, where the air is forever filled with music.

The world is less bright with your passing.


Nether Lands

High on this mountain
The clouds down below
I'm feeling so strong and alive
From this rocky perch
I'll continue to search
For the wind and the snow and the sky
Oh I want a lover and I want some friends
And I want to live in the sun
And I want to do all the things that I never have done
Sunny bright mornings and pale moonlit nights
Keep me from feeling alone
Now I'm learning to fly and this freedom is like
Nothing that I've ever known
Oh I've seen the bottom and I've been on top
But mostly I've lived in between
And where do you go when you get to the end of your dream
Off in the Nether Lands I heard the sound
Like the beating of heavenly wings
And deep in my brain I can hear a refrain
Of my soul as she rises and sings
Anthems to glory and anthems to love
And hymns filled with earthly delight
Like the songs that the darkness composes to worship the light
Once in a vision I came on some woods
And stood at a fork in the road
My choices were clear yet I froze with the fear
Of not knowing which way to go
Oh, one road was simple acceptance of life
The other road offered sweet peace
When I made my decision
My vision became my release

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